tits n’ pricks #2

Are you men-stru-a-ting at the moment? she whispered loudly across the crowded corridor.
No, I whispered back.
Jolly good, she said very loudly. You can pee in a pot again for me.

So I did, although I made a bit of a mess this time.  I am not a man and don’t have as much experience in the Art of Aim.

*blush*

I had more blood taken … not as much, but it hurt more and is just so that they can confirm my blood group, apparently.  I also discovered (after 36 years!) that my blood group is o+. 

Huzzah! (Apparently that’s a good start?)

Four to six weeks and we find out if the tissue typing is a match.

*fingers crossed*

Advertisements

3 comments

  1. **fingers crossed for you***

    Meanwhile: I *hate* pissing in the pot. I always miss. It’s amazing how many directions pee can come out. I don’t understand, and I always get very frustrated and angry at that point. Thank you for raising the issue.

    Hey I am in Alnwick enjoying the last of the summers roses. So beautiful, I can’t get over gardens in the UK. I am looking forward to going home, though the garden at Alnwick was glorious today, and tomorrow I’m going back to look at the castle. And I noticed a wool shop in town I might check out… can’t go home till after this second conference which is on 11-13 September. Sigh. Missing husband and cats. To save $$, am doing a tea and scones tour, and a soup tour. To spend $$ (and to get wifi at night) I am staying in B&Bs. With wifi I can skype my husband.

    just wanted to tell you about it.

  2. Oh, I am so pleased it’s not just me! I find the whole ‘peeing in a pot’ issue very difficult to bring into a conversation so have never really had the opportunity to realise that it probably affects many women! I actually managed to get some pee on the floor, but refrained from adding it to my blog post because it just seemed so odd that it got there, and I thought I must be very unusual!

    Okay, tmi.

    How do Australian folk pronounce scone? Does it rhyme with traffic/ice-cream cone or with John? That’s a bit of a redundant question because the pronunciation of it here depends where you live. I say it both ways. *shrug*

    Have you made it to Scotland yet? And are you enjoying the odd weather … I’m assuming that the rest of the UK has been a mixture of hotness and rain and dark lingering clouds. It’s silly weather.

    I am back at work.

    *sigh* (I can think of no words to express my true horror at being back at work, so am reduced to sighing deeply)

    Tell me more, anytime. I like it.

    1. How did I miss this reply to my reply? With many important questions therein. Hmm.

      1. pissing and missing. I have a theory about this, which I must tell you about sometime.
      2. Scone is normally pronounced to rhyme with “john” here in Australia. By which I mean, that’s how I pronounce it. But it is also sometimes pronounced the other way, to rhyme with traffic cone. 🙂 I loved the scones in the UK, faaaabulous.
      3. Making it to Scotland: I think I liked the tea rooms in Scotland best, because the little man who ran the Buttercup was so eccentric. When the scones were ready he went out the back, put on an apron, and began crying “SCOOOOOOOOONES!!!!!”… then he rushed out onto the street and physically dragged some more customers in and sat them at a table with some other customers, and then coming out with the tray, presented each scone taker with their scone, and the instructions, “Don’t TOUCH it for a minute!!!” I do like ceremony and occasion, this made the taking of scones into a room-wide event.

      Possibly these were also the tastiest scones, but the ones I remember as the tastiest were in Northumberland at the Alnwick gardens, because by the time I ate them I was both hungry and thirsty, so the tea was delicious and the scones were wonderful.

      4. the weather was a great disappointment in one respect, I wanted authentic British weather, I wanted cold, I packed a huge coat. I got sunny sunshine, it was warmer in the UK than it was in Sydney before I left, and it was Autumn in the UK, Spring in Sydney. But then one day I got some rain, and I realised the problem. It was light, thin, needly, annoying rain, but apart from that, it came in horizontally, so that no matter what you did you got wet. And couldn’t see past your umbrella, which had to be in front of you, stopping the rain. Very disconcerting. So when it turned fine again the next day I realised that in fact I should be very glad to have so much sunshine. Much better for photographs of gardens and castles. I am more used to rain which falls more or less from the sky to the ground, more or less vertically, and with big fat drops so its quite heavy, and it comes in and then stops. I suppose we do get the soft needly rain sometimes down here in the south, in Sydney. The rain I am used to is probably northern rain, which is more tropical. Also did you know that the sunlight in the UK / Europe is softer than Australian sunlight… I prefer your version, its easier on the eyes and probably less carcinogenic.

      Probably that’s way more commentary than you were expecting. And I haven’t told you about how much I loved Northumberland, nor how I found my ancestor’s grave in Burford (surgeon, died 1794), nor how amazing Oxford was, nor about how my plane was delayed 13 hours and I ended up spending 36 hours awake on the way home. The summary: it was fun. I liked it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s